64 Chetwynd Street

64 Chetwynd Street
West Melbourne VIC 3003
photographer: Stephen Hatcher 2021

Also known as Cairnlieth Terrace Source: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article198176853
Previous Address 64 was also known as 42 Chetwynd Street, West Melbourne before street renumbering. Source: source: Sands & McDougall directory
Constructed 13/9/1884
Style
Architect William Pitt
Builder James Amess, 47 Dryburgh St, Hotham

Timelapse Building Images

2004

source: http://maps.melbourne.vic.gov.au/


Land Details

  1. 1895 MMBW map
  2. 1859 The Argus, Crown land sale
  3. Compiled Crown Record Plan

Building Details

Notice of Intention to Build.

Number: 1082

Date : 13/9/1884

Street: Chetwynd Street

Architect: William Pitt

Owner: T. B. [James] Spence

Builder: James Amess, 47 Dryburgh St, Hotham

Type: Two cottages [with their own private back gardens]

Fee: £3.10.0

Architects Owner Suburb Building Type Builder Build Date (YYYY MM DD) Reg #
McIlroy, J Capel Street, West Melbourne Houses; Shops Amess, James – 47 Dryburgh st 1886 10 27 2502
Pitt, W Spence, T B Chetwynd Street, West Melbourne Houses Amess, James – 47 Dryburgh St Hotham 1884 09 13 1082

source: Burchett Index


Subsequent Building Alterations

No Entries Found

Architectural Features



    No Entries Found


Heritage Significance and Listings

Heritage Listings and Explanatory Notes

62-64 Chetwynd Street were designed by the renowned architect William Pitt.

Contributory elements include:
-a brick row house pair of one storey;
-unusual siting and elevated form;
-parapeted and stuccoed, with a pedimented raised entablature central to the pair with an acroterion at the apex, scrolls, swags and balustrading on either side;
-iron verandah brackets, friezes and balustrade using the Angus McLean’s pattern of 1877;
-three light double-hung sash windows;

-entry with side and top lights; and
-iron palisade front fences set on dressed stone plinths with cemented and capped masonry piers, high retaining walls to the verandahs and a long, distinctive scalloped garden dividing-wall between.

The three houses (62-66 Chetwynd Street) are sited high on an embankment and well back from the street but a are a relatively isolated trio from the mainstream Victorian and Edwardian-era streetscape.

source: West Melbourne Heritage Review by Graeme Butler & Associates 2015.

Owners

From To Owner More Info Data Source
to date Private source: Hatcher Index
1859 Mr. Alexander Campbell, first Crown land purchaser source: Hatcher Index
abt 40 thousand years earlier 1835 Boon Wurrung and Woiwurrung (Wurundjeri) peoples of the Kulin Nation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Victoria source: Hatcher Index

Residents

From To Resident More Info Data Source
to date Private source Hatcher Index
1925 1974 Francis G. Calway and Mrs. Florence Calway http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11369921 source: Sands & McDougall directory, transcribed by Lindsay Thomas in 2020.
1920 1920 Alfred E. Day source: Sands & McDougall directory, transcribed by Lindsay Thomas in 2020.
1915 1915 Douglas Laird source: Sands & McDougall directory, transcribed by Lindsay Thomas in 2020.
1910 1910 John Jones source: Sands & McDougall directory, transcribed by Lindsay Thomas in 2020.
1905 1905 Miss. Laby source: Sands & McDougall directory, transcribed by Lindsay Thomas in 2020.
1900 1900 Charles Clark Armstrong source: Sands & McDougall directory, transcribed by Lindsay Thomas in 2020.
1895 1895 Mrs. Alice Matthewson source: Sands & McDougall directory, transcribed by Lindsay Thomas in 2020.
1890 1890 Charles E. Hirst source: Sands & McDougall directory, transcribed by Lindsay Thomas in 2020.
1889 William Hint source: Rate Book Records, VPRS5708 Bourke Ward, Chetwynd St.

Social History

1900 Melbourne Leader.

MARSHALL— ARMSTRONG.— On the 27th September, at “Cairnlieth,” 64 Chetwynd-street, West Melbourne, the residence of the bride’s parents, by the Rev. James Gibson, Roderick (Robt.), of the Victorian Railways, second son of John M’Curdie Marshall, Eades-place, West Melbourne, to Jennie, fifth daughter of Charles Clark Armstrong, late of Dunedin, New Zealand.

source: Melbourne Leader



Context and Streetscape

Precinct

This property resides within the municipality of the City of Melbourne. We respectfully acknowledge it is on the traditional land of the Kulin Nation.
source: https://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/SiteCollectionDocuments/history-city-of-melbourne.pdf
historical map source: https://www.slv.vic.gov.au/search-discover/explore-collections-format/maps/maps-melbourne-city-suburbs

Zoning
This information must be verified with the relevant planning or heritage authority.

Streetscape

Chetwynd Street was once predominantly a residential street with single and two storey Victorian terrace dwellings, two churches, a school and two hotels known as the Queens Arms and the Star of Hotham.

The Chetwynd streetscape today is characterised by a mix of multi-storey blocks of public flats, some modern commercial/industrial buildings, an ambulance depot, and a school.

In 2021, only fifty of the original one hundred and twenty-nine Victorian heritage dwellings once found on this street remain, compared to the 1895 Melbourne Metropolitan Board of Works map.

Other Information

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Copyright status: This work is in copyright.
Conditions of use: Use of this work allowed provided the creators name and Hotham History Project Inc are acknowledged.

If you or someone you know has any more to add either by old photos or stories of this area, please contact us today. Email info@hothamhistory.org.au