Carroll Street

Carroll Street North Melbourne, near Pleasance Gardens running between Canning and Erskine Streets was built on an early bluestone quarry site (1) once owned by Hugh Peck. Early 1860’s the piece of land known as Crown Section 85A had been set aside as a proposed reserve for a public park, however for some reason the land got subdivided up by the Crown into house blocks with a road down the middle and sold off. Carroll street is thought to have been named after a local Hotham identity of Irish background, Councilor James Carroll (1815-1895) Esq. J.P. (2) Carroll Street sits between Canning Street, also named after an Irish politician, George Canning and Erskine Street, said to have been named after Thomas Erskine known as the “Advocate of All” for his contribution as a Lawyer and later politician. North Melbourne did well to sandwich Carroll Street between Canning and Erskine streets — symbols of Politics balanced on Law. If you know any more about the history of this street or its people and would like to share, please contact us today. source: (1) North Melbourne Advertiser, 4th May 1875 page 2. (2) Men of Hotham, author Heather McKay, publisher Hotham History …

Roden Street

Early records show residents began living in this street as early as the 1850s’. Roden Street in West Melbourne is thought to have been named after an Irish Tory politician, Robert Jocelyn, 3rd Earl of Roden who was best remembered for his strong support for Protestant causes in the north of Ireland. Robert had been appointed Vice-Chamberlain of the Royal Household of the United Kingdom from 1812 to 1827 The street crosses King, Spencer and Adderley streets and ends at Railway Place near the train line between Southern Cross station and North Melbourne station. An old map shows numbering on Roden Street began in the north at number one near the National Trust-classified West Melbourne State School that was built in 1875. Tens of thousands of children from North & West Melbourne attended that school over its lifetime. The building was designed by architects Leonard Terry and Percy Oakden. In 1992 the building and playgrounds were sold to the Salvation Army. In 1874 at number two, opposite the school, T. Richardson & Co operated a boot factory that employed many locals. The site of that unique early Victorian building is now a five-storey block of flats. In 1895 Roden Street …